Contraceptive (Birth Control)

View as Grid List

Items 1-12 of 17

Set Descending Direction
  1. Generic: Medroxyprogesterone Acetate
    Equivalent Brand: Provera
    30 Tablet/s
    $9.10
  2. Generic: Drospirenone and Ethinyl Estradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Yasmin
    24 Tablet/s
    $13.00
  3. Generic: Centchroman/Ormeloxifene
    Equivalent Brand: Centron
    30 Tablet/s
    Rating:
    80%
    $21.00
  4. Generic: Levonorgestrel and Ethinylestradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Seasonique
    21 Tablet/s
    $5.00
  5. Generic: levonorgestrel
    Equivalent Brand: Plan B
    3 Pill/s
    $8.50
  6. Generic: Levonorgestrel and Ethinylestradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Seasonique
    21 Tablet/s
    $10.00
  7. Generic: Desogestrel
    Equivalent Brand: Cerazette
    28 Tablet/s
    $10.00
  8. Generic: Drospirenone and Ethinyl Estradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Yaz
    24 Tablet/s
    $8.00
  9. Generic: Estradiol + Desofestrel
    Equivalent Brand: Mercilon
    21 Tablet/s
    $10.00
  10. Generic: levonorgestrel
    Equivalent Brand: Plan B
    3 Tablet/s
    $13.00
  11. Generic: Levonorgestrel and Ethinylestradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Seasonique
    21 Tablet/s
    $8.00
  12. Generic: Norgestrel + Ethinyl Estradiol
    Equivalent Brand: Ogestrel
    40 Tablet/s
    $18.94
Page
per page

Birth control medicine uses
 
 
 
Birth control medicines are used to prevent pregnancy, and there are several different types available. Here are some common uses for birth control medicine:

Oral Contraceptives: Oral contraceptives, also known as birth control pills, are a popular form of birth control. They contain hormones that prevent ovulation and thicken the cervical mucus, making it harder for sperm to reach the egg. Oral contraceptives are taken daily and are highly effective when taken correctly.
Contraceptive Patches: Contraceptive patches contain the same hormones as oral contraceptives and are applied to the skin once a week. They work in the same way as oral contraceptives, preventing ovulation and thickening the cervical mucus.
Contraceptive Rings: Contraceptive rings are inserted into the vagina once a month and release hormones that prevent ovulation and thicken the cervical mucus.
Contraceptive Injections: Contraceptive injections are given once every three months and contain hormones that prevent ovulation and thicken the cervical mucus.
Intrauterine Devices (IUDs): IUDs are small, T-shaped devices that are inserted into the uterus and can provide long-term birth control. Some IUDs contain hormones that prevent ovulation, while others are made of copper, which creates an environment that is hostile to sperm.
Barrier Methods: Barrier methods, such as condoms, diaphragms, and cervical caps, physically block sperm from reaching the egg.
It's important to discuss your options with your healthcare provider to determine the best birth control method for you based on your health, lifestyle, and personal preferences. Additionally, some birth control methods may offer other benefits, such as reducing the risk of certain types of cancer or improving menstrual symptoms.
 

Contraceptive medicine precaution
 
 
 
There are several precautions to keep in mind when using contraceptive medicine. Here are some common ones:

Effectiveness: The effectiveness of contraceptive medicine can vary depending on the type of medication, how consistently it is used, and other factors such as the user's weight. It's important to discuss the effectiveness of your chosen method with your healthcare provider and to use it consistently and correctly to maximize its effectiveness.
Health Conditions: Some health conditions may make certain contraceptive methods less effective or unsuitable. For example, women with a history of blood clots, stroke, heart attack, or certain types of cancer may not be able to use hormonal contraceptives. Additionally, some medications can interfere with the effectiveness of contraceptives, such as antibiotics, antifungal medications, and some herbal supplements.
Side Effects: Like all medications, contraceptive medicine can cause side effects. Common side effects of hormonal contraceptives include nausea, headaches, breast tenderness, and changes in mood. More serious side effects, such as blood clots, heart attack, or stroke, are rare but can occur, especially in women who smoke or have other risk factors.
Other Forms of Protection: Contraceptive medicine does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It's important to use barrier methods, such as condoms, in addition to contraceptive medicine to reduce the risk of STIs.
Age: Some types of contraceptive medicine may not be suitable for young women, especially those who have not yet reached puberty. Additionally, older women may be at increased risk of certain health conditions, such as blood clots or stroke, and may need to use a different form of birth control.
It's important to discuss any concerns or questions about contraceptive medicine with your healthcare provider. They can help you choose the best form of birth control for your health and lifestyle and provide guidance on how to use it correctly and safely.
 

Birth control medicine side effects
 
 
 
Birth control medicine can cause various side effects, although not everyone experiences them. The type and severity of side effects can vary depending on the specific medication and individual factors such as age, health status, and lifestyle. Here are some common side effects of birth control medicine:

Nausea: Some people may experience nausea when they first start taking birth control medicine. This side effect usually improves within a few weeks.
Headaches: Headaches can be a common side effect of hormonal birth control, particularly in the first few months of use.
Breast tenderness: Some women may experience breast tenderness or enlargement as a side effect of hormonal birth control.
Mood changes: Hormonal birth control can affect mood in some people, leading to symptoms such as irritability, anxiety, or depression.
Weight changes: Some people may experience weight gain or weight loss as a side effect of hormonal birth control.
Changes in menstrual cycle: Hormonal birth control can cause changes in the menstrual cycle, such as lighter or heavier bleeding, spotting between periods, or missed periods.
Blood clots: There is a small risk of blood clots with hormonal birth control, especially in women who smoke or have other risk factors such as a history of blood clots or certain medical conditions.
Increased risk of breast cancer: Some studies suggest that certain types of hormonal birth control may be associated with a slightly increased risk of breast cancer, especially in women who use it for long periods of time.
It's important to discuss any concerns about side effects with your healthcare provider. They can help you determine the best form of birth control for your individual needs and provide guidance on how to manage any side effects that you may experience. Additionally, it's important to seek medical attention immediately if you experience any serious side effects, such as severe headache, chest pain, or difficulty breathing.
 

Contraceptive medicine interaction
 
 
 
Contraceptive medicine can interact with other medications, supplements, and certain medical conditions, potentially affecting its effectiveness and increasing the risk of side effects. Here are some common interactions to keep in mind:

Antibiotics: Some antibiotics can reduce the effectiveness of hormonal birth control, including the pill, patch, and ring. If you are prescribed antibiotics, you should use a backup method of birth control for the duration of the treatment and for at least one week afterwards.
Antifungal medications: Some antifungal medications can also reduce the effectiveness of hormonal birth control.
Herbal supplements: Certain herbal supplements, such as St. John's wort, can also reduce the effectiveness of hormonal birth control.
Seizure medications: Some medications used to treat seizures, such as phenytoin and carbamazepine, can reduce the effectiveness of hormonal birth control.
Medications that affect liver enzymes: Some medications that affect liver enzymes, such as rifampin and some HIV medications, can also reduce the effectiveness of hormonal birth control.
Medical conditions: Some medical conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease or certain types of cancer, may affect the effectiveness of hormonal birth control.
It's important to discuss any medications or medical conditions with your healthcare provider before starting contraceptive medicine. They can help you determine the best form of birth control for your individual needs and provide guidance on how to manage any potential interactions or concerns. Additionally, it's important to use a backup method of birth control if you are prescribed any medication that may interact with hormonal birth control

Read More